Why is half of LED strip not working?

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Why is half of LED strip not working? Isn’t it annoying if half of your LED strip isn’t working in your room? There’s either a blown bulb or the strip is bent and you’re not aware of it. However, there could be other reasons as well. Before you replace the half of the strip that isn’t working, read this article.

half of LED strip not working
Pic – LED strip lights

Why is half of LED strip not working?

There are several things that can go wrong with half of the LED strip. If a whole LED Strip segment is illuminated, but a piece of the LED strip stays dark, you could have a “short circuit” in one of the portions.

This signifies that one of the LEDs or components for a single portion has come loose owing to a manufacturing error or some mechanical damage during shipping or installation, resulting in a complete electrical disconnection for only that part of LEDs.

If you know how to solder, you might try soldering the solder joints for each LED and part along that dead portion. If not, your best bet is to ask your provider for a replacement (if they provide a warranty) or simply remove the faulty section by cutting along the cut-lines and reconnecting the two segments using connector clips.

How to Repair Half of an LED Strip That Isn’t Working?

Some customers have complained that their light strips are not operating correctly. According to these consumers, half of their LED strips work just fine while the other half do not. As a result, people are perplexed about what is going on.

This is why, today, we will examine the problem and advise you on how to resolve it. We’ll go over a variety of steps that should all help us troubleshoot the problem. Here are all of them, as listed below:

1. Confirm that the voltage and current ratings of your power supply are suitable with your LED strip

If your power source is 12V DC, it will not operate with a 24V LED strip. The output voltage should be marked on the back of the power supply unit. Then, examine the LED strip, with its input voltage observed at the LED strip connection locations.

2. Verify that your power supply is functioning

A fast multimeter test to verify the voltage across the two output wires, or voltage between the DC plug’s inner pin and outer barrel, should show a voltage differential. If the voltage is less than the rated voltage, you may have a faulty power supply. It should be noted that the power supply must be turned on for this test.

3. Verify and isolate any other accessories connected to the same circuit.

Remove any additional dimmers and controllers from the circuit and see if you can get the LED strip to light up without them. If the LED strip works, the issue is with the dimmer or controller or the connection leading up to or from those accessories.

It should be noted that the power supply must be turned on for this test. Never connect a low voltage DC (e.g., 12V/24V) LED strip directly to a mains voltage (e.g., 120V/240V) wall outlet!

4. Look for any indicators of short circuits that are evident.

You may have unwittingly made a short circuit by allowing the positive and negative wires to come into touch, especially if you connect your wires rather than utilizing solderless accessories.

Check the whole LED strip connections with a fast visual inspection to confirm that the wires are appropriately separated. Short circuits of this type are more common when working with multi-channel strip lights, such as 5-color LED strips with six connecting points.

5. Look for any loose connections that are visible.

Check whether all of your connectors and cables are still in place and haven’t come loose. Tighten DC adapter screws and re-insert LED strips into solderless connectors, as these are common contact failure spots.

If you have a multimeter, look for a voltage difference between the positive and negative (ground) wires/terminals at each point along the circuit. Begin with the DC output of the power supply and work your way to the LED strip. If there is no voltage differential between the positive and negative copper pads on the LED strip, power is not provided to the LED strip due to a fault before reaching the LED strip portion.

6. Look for any broken LED strip sections and repair them

If half of your strip is working just fine but the other half has a faulty portion, you may have half of a defective light strip with half-working LEDs in series. In this case, it is best to cut out the bad half by cutting across cut lines on the back of the strip light and joining the half-broken half with a new LED strip.

If you want to connect additional segments, solderless connectors should be used for quick and easy connection over soldering or crimping wires. If there is not enough room on one side of the back, try placing it in an alternate position, especially for longer strips. If the half-broken half is too long, you can use LED strip cutters or special copper pad nibblers to shorten it.

7. Look for any broken solder points that are visible

If half of your LED strip is not working but the other half has a perfect appearance, you may have half of a broken light strip with half-inactive LEDs in parallel. In this case, it is best to cut out the bad half by cutting across cut lines on the back of the strip light and joining the half-broken half with a new LED strip.

If you want to connect additional segments, solderless connectors should be used for quick and easy connection over soldering or crimping wires. If there is not enough room on one side of the back, try placing it in an alternate position, especially for longer strips. If half the bad half is too long, you can use LED strip cutters or special copper pad nibblers to shorten it.

8. Replace the power supply or LED strip itself

If all other troubleshooting steps fail, then either your power supply is bad or half of your LED strip is bad and needs to be replaced. Test your power supply with other half-broken half-LED strips that are half-working half-LEDs in parallel until you find a half-broken half-LED strip where it fails to illuminate.

In this case, the LED strip may be bad even though half is working perfectly. Your power supply should operate all LEDs at half brightness. Half-brightness or dim lighting suggests a power problem with half of your half-broken half-LED strip, requiring that half to be replaced. Here you can find a lot of power supplies for your LED strip light!

9) Look for evidence of short circuits that aren’t evident

If you don’t see any visible short circuits after a visual inspection, you could wish to look for hidden short circuits. The quickest approach to check this is to use a multimeter once more.

Test the resistance value by connecting the multimeter contacts to the LED strip’s positive (+) and negative (-) copper pads. The multimeter should read infinite resistance if there is no short circuit. If any resistance value is displayed, it means there is a short circuit.

Disconnect all accessories and connections. If a short circuit is detected, check to see if the short circuit on the LED strip remains. If it happens, it’s a sign that there’s a problem with the LED strip.

The cut-line of the LED strip, where scissors were employed, is a common short circuit point. In most cases, LED strips are made up of two copper layers separated by a thin insulation layer. If the scissors do not produce a clean-cut, the insulating layer at the cut site may fail, resulting in a short circuit.

If you suspect a short circuit on an LED strip section but can’t see any visual symptoms of a short circuit, cut off the last 1-2 inches of the LED strip on both ends to eliminate the potentially damaged cut-line segment. To guarantee a clean-cut, we recommend using sharp scissors, as dulled, blunt scissors are more prone to “squish” the copper and insulation layers, resulting in a short circuit.

10. Replace the LED strip itself

If all other troubleshooting steps have been unsuccessful, then it is likely that your LED strip has worn out and needs to be replaced. Here you can find a list of best-Led strip lights ideas for your home.

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